West's Annotated California Codes Education Code: West’s Ann.Cal.Educ.Code § 8850.5. Family Relationships and Parenting Education

“Family relationships and parenting education,” as used in this chapter, means an instructional program designed to provide pupils at all grade levels with age-appropriate components, including all of the following:
(a) Development of an understanding of the physical, mental, emotional, social, economic, and psychological aspects of themselves and others, and of the physiological, psychological, and cultural foundations of human development.
(b) The opportunity to acquire knowledge which will support the development of responsible family relationships, strengthen the pupil's current family life, and further the understanding of the role of the parent.
(c) Development of an understanding of the consequences of decisions and actions upon personal, family, and peer relationships.
(d) Recognition of, and attention to, the significance of healthy self-esteem in the growth and development of healthy human beings.

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Positive and Negative Relationships

In our discussion of networks thus far, we have generally viewed the relationships contained in these networks as having positive connotations links have typically indicated such things as friendship, collaboration, sharing of information, or membership in a group. The terminology of on-line social networks reflects a largely similar view, through its emphasis on the connections one forms with friends, fans, followers, and so forth. But in most network settings, there are also negative effects at work. Some relations are friendly, but others are antagonistic or hostile; interactions between people or groups are regularly beset by controversy, disagreement, and sometimes outright conflict. How should we reason about the mix of positive and negative relationships that take place within a network? Here we describe a rich part of social network theory that involves taking a network and annotating its links (i.e., its edges) with positive and negative signs. Positive links represent friendship while negative links ...

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I Do Not Take Rejection Well

I do not take rejection well at all. I have had a crush on a man for a long time, even though we have never talked to each other. For a long period of time he would look at me and give me signals that he liked me, but that has since stopped. I have tried to think of someone else who I might like, but somehow my mind always seems to wander back to this man. Part of me wants to stop liking him and move on, but I don’t know how. I’m afraid to tell anyone about this, because once I spoke of things to a friend, but when we parted ways she told everybody everything I had told her in confidence. This usually brings down my self-confidence. My parents say that they worry that I have emotional issues and want me to see a psychologist instead of a therapist. Why? I have emotional issues, not psychological issues!

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Denial, Minimization, Blaming, and Intimate Aggression in Dating Partners

Although countering denial, minimization, and externalization of blame is a key component of most interventions for individuals who have been abusive in their intimate relationships, these attributions have only seldom been the focus of empirical investigation. Using a sample of 139 male and female university students, this study examined the associations between self-reported minimizing and blaming attributions and the perpetration of physical, sexual, and psychological aggression against an intimate partner. For men, minimization of conflict and partner blame were associated with self-reported perpetration of intimate partner aggression, even after controlling for socially desirable responding and relationship satisfaction. In contrast, women’s aggression was associated only with partner blame. Discussion focuses on overlap with similar areas of research, gender differences in minimization and blaming, and on potential directions for further empirical work on the associations of intimate aggression, relationship dissatisfaction, and attribution.

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Betrayal, Rejection, Revenge, and Forgiveness: An Interpersonal Script Approach

Introduction

Throughout recorded human history, treachery and betrayal have been considered amongst the very worst offences people could commit against their kith and kin. Dante, for example, relegated traitors to the lowest and coldest regions of Hell, to be forever frozen up to their necks in a lake of ice with blizzards storming all about them, as punishment for having acted so coldly toward others. Even today, the crime of treason merits the most severe penalties, including capital punishment. However, betrayals need not involve issues of national security to be regarded as serious. From sexual infidelity to disclosing a friend’s secrets, betraying another person or group of people implies unspeakable disloyalty, a breach of trust, and a violation of what is good and proper. Moreover, all of us will suffer both minor and major betrayals throughout our lives, and most of us will, if only unwittingly, betray others (Jones & Burdette,

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Factors of Attraction and Relationship Satisfaction: The Love-is-Blind Bias and Perceived Risk of Infidelity

Abstract

Attraction and relationship satisfaction have been topics of increased investigation over the past several decades (Yela & Sangrador, 2001; Buss & Schmitt, 1993; Hall & Taylor, 1976). The love-is-blind bias hypothesizes that individuals within fulfilling relationships exhibit the phenomenon of rating their partner’s attractiveness higher than self-ratings of their own attractiveness, a product of positive partner illusions (Swami & Furnham, 2008; Gagné, & Lydon, 2004). Using the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) and novel measures for attraction and perceived infidelity, this study applied the love-is-blind hypothesis against relationship satisfaction and perceived risk of infidelity. The creation of two new subscales for measuring the love-is-blind bias, self-perceived love-is-blind bias (SPB) and externally-perceived love-is-blind bias (EPB) were instrumental in computations. Significant positive interactions between both scales of the love-is-blind bias and both attraction, and relationship satisfaction were found. Perceived risk of infidelity was negatively...

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Common Behavioral Patterns that Perpetuate Power Relations of Domination

Power is the ability to act the more access to resources one has, the more options one has.Power differences are expressed in institutional and cultural contexts. These power differences continually inform our interpersonal relationships.The following chart shows some patterns people learn in order to survive in a hierarchical society. Not to conform to expected behavior risks social ostracism, privilege and /or one’s survival.These patterns take place in correspondence to each other; they are tendencies in relationships not personality characteristics. They are to be read horizontally. When we ignore these patterns or fail to act to transform them, we reinforce the dominant culture's injustice, even if we aspire to egalitarian relationships. It takes courage to step outside of the norms and feels as though one is going against the grain. Because they are relational a shift on one side brings about a change on both sides and the pattern is broken....

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